Biennale of Sydney

Melissa Dubbin and Aaron S. Davidson

Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Delay Lines, 2019, water from subterranean Asahi River, borosilicate glass, overclocked water-cooled computer, silicone soft robot manta, silicon boules, temperature sensors, micro-controllers, air compressor, air control system, simulated environment, monitor, metal, plastic and power supplies, dimensions variable. Installation view for If the Snake (2019) at Okayama Art Summit, Okayama City, Japan. Courtesy the collection of Ishikawa Foundation, Okayama, Japan. Photograph: Ola Rindal.
Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Delay Lines, 2019, water from subterranean Asahi River, borosilicate glass, overclocked water-cooled computer, silicone soft robot manta, silicon boules, temperature sensors, micro-controllers, air compressor, air control system, simulated environment, monitor, metal, plastic and power supplies, dimensions variable. Installation view for If the Snake (2019) at Okayama Art Summit, Okayama City, Japan. Courtesy the collection of Ishikawa Foundation, Okayama, Japan. Photograph: Aaron S. Davidson.
Melissa Dubbin & Aaron S. Davidson, Delay Lines, 2019, water from subterranean Asahi River, borosilicate glass, overclocked water-cooled computer, silicone soft robot manta, silicon boules, temperature sensors, micro-controllers, air compressor, air control system, simulated environment, monitor, metal, plastic and power supplies, dimensions variable. Installation view for If the Snake (2019) at Okayama Art Summit, Okayama City, Japan. Courtesy the collection of Ishikawa Foundation, Okayama, Japan. Photograph: Aaron S. Davidson.

Melissa Dubbin and Aaron S. Davidson

Melissa Dubbin 
Born 1976 in New Mexico, USA
Lives and works in New York and California, USA

Aaron S. Davidson
Born 1971 in Wisconsin, USA
Lives and works in New York and California, USA


Melissa Dubbin and Aaron S. Davidson apply collaborative processes in their practice and engagement with materials. Their works are characterised by transformations of the biological and mechanical; gemstones record, metals have memory, sounds are given shape and fluids must be maintained for computational machines to perform and create. Pneumatically driven creatures question and restate notions of empathy with synthetic intelligence. Silver, iron and silica, the materials of information storage, are recast and animated by water and air to maintain equilibriums and generate new forms. Dubbin and Davidson’s most recent projects explore relations between the environment, computing, robotics and artificial life forms.